Chicamacomico Farm

A wetland CWH restored in a wet farm field on this Dorchester county farm. The vegetation shown consists of fall panicum and wild millet. An aerial view of the Chic farm showing many acres of restored wetlands and flooded fields for wildlife. View from an airplane of the restored wetlands and flooded fields of Chic farm.    
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Cottingham Farm

An overhead Google earth view of a 15 acre constructed wetland sanctuary surrounded by a native grass buffer at Cottingham Farm. The wetland is well used by migrating shorebirds and wildfowl. This farm is protected by a conservation easement. This image shows sheetwater in the emergent vegetation as the wetland starts to fill up with fall rains. Water levels are lowered in the spring to stimulate annual plants which serve as great waterfowl food when flooded in the fall and winter. A controlled burn in the native grass buffer. Monarch on wingstem
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Shipping Creek Farm

This Google earth photo shows Garmin GPS flags at all the spots where we did soil borings to make sure the 20 acre wetland would actually stay wet ( hold water). We are on the lookout for patches of sandy earth that can cause the constructed wetland to drain through the subsoil and be drier than desired. If we find those sandy lenses we excavate them and replace the sand with water holding clay. The buffer meadow at Woodmender Farm provides good habitat for upland birds and pollinators adjacent to the wetland. The berm that impounds the rainfall to create the wetland to the right. One can see the shallow emergent vegetation in this picture with pockets of slightly deeper open water which grow submerged…
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Canterbury Farm

Painted turtle enjoying a basking log on the wetlands at Canterbury Farm which is owned by CWH. We used CREP to restore over 35 acres of shallow freshwater marshes on the property. The land is permanently protected from development and conversion back to agricultural use by a conservation easement. Gadwalls making use of the very shallow waters of restored wetlands. This shows the deeper (2-3 foot) pool areas where water is present even in the driest summers. We obtain the material for the berms (which we use to impound the rainfall and restore the wetland) from these spots. They provide a wet refuge for reptiles and amphibians in summer as well as growing submerged aquatic vegetation to provide wildfowl food. One can see the very…
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Martin’s Point

This wet 17 acre farm field was restored to a shallow emergent wetland using CREP and additional help from Maryland DNR This "before" aerial of the site (outlined with yellow line) shows the drainage leads that were used to try to make the area dry enough to grow row crops before we converted it into a wetland. This flock of tundra swans made good use of the shallow freshwater wetland in its first winter (shown in February at full pool)
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Pickering Creek

This is an aerial photo at Pickering Creek Audubon Center of the approximately 70 acres of freshwater wetlands we had designed and restored there as of 2009 using the United States Department of Agriculture's Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program with additional funding from a number of other partners (Md DNR, Biophilia Fdn, CWH, NFWF, TWF). These marshes have become a birding hotspot. This is the first wetland we did at Pickering.   An Egret makes use of the shallow 14 acre wetland completed in August 2014. A typical landscape level wetland restoration under CWH Chesapeake Care Program The PCAC wetlands have become an important part of the educational program. This elevated platform allows the occupants to get a better view of the restored wetland complex.
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Bailey’s Neck

Dusky time at the 18 acre shallow emergent constructed wetland that CWH designed and built on Bailey's Neck. We also own about 100 acres of wooded wetlands on adjacent lands there that are permanently protected for wildlife. An old barn that CWH is preserving next to the wetland to protect a nesting site for turkey vultures. A bumblebee enjoys common milkweed in the wetland buffer. A pied-billed grebe enjoys the shallow wetland habitat. The observation blind overlooking the Bailey's Neck wetlands donated by the Healy family in honor of Martha Healy. This shows the barn that the vultures use to nest in, their favorite dead roosting tree, the rain garden full of tickseed sunflowers, and the Healy observation blind.
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Talisman Farm

  This CREP map shows the extensive wetland restoration and buffer establishment (about 150 acres total) that CWH has done at Talisman Farm near Grasonville.   Before: March 22, 2010 - Poor farming practices allowed this 4 foot deep gully to develop before CWH took over management of the land. After: November 1, 2011- The same gully area now restored to a shallow freshwater wetland that helps take the nutrients out of 15 acres of actively farmed land while providing excellent wildlife habitat. A 5 acre freshwater wetland restored at Talisman Farm in what was a very wet farm field area right next to a tidal creek-it catches runoff from actively farmed land. Excavation equipment stored "high and dry" (or so we thought) until a…
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