Early Successional Articles

The American Woodcock, And Why We Should Be Cutting More Trees – Cool Green Science

Throughout their lives and even within a single day, American Woodcock are citizens of many habitats. By day they forage in forest, probing the soft soil with their bill in search of worms and insects. But every evening at sundown woodcock silhouettes appear in the sky as the birds commute from the forest to settle in fields and clearings where they spend each night. One reason they may do this to avoid predators.  By measuring predator activity in both habitats, a recent study in Rhode Island found that predator abundance at night was far lower in open fields where woodcock roost compared to the forests where they spend the day.  Read
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Early Successional Articles

Vegetation Studies in Power-line Rights-of-way (ROWs)

Vegetation Studies in Power-line Rights-of-way (ROWs) Managing for wildlife while maintaining a safe, reliable, national electric utility power supply In the United States there are between 8 and 10 million acres of utility ROW, comprising potential unique wildlife habitat opportunities in property that is owned or accessed by electric, oil and gas companies. Recognizing the potential for this unique habitat within power line rights-of-way (ROW), in 1994 Conectiv Power Delivery (CPD) and Chesapeake Wildlife Heritage (CWH) formed a 15-year partnership in various research projects in Maryland, Delaware and New Jersey. From that liaison, in 2007 CWH evolved a partnership with Integrated Vegetation Management Partners (IVMP), a newly create NPO, formed by Rick Johnstone, former forester for CPD. Our research efforts have concentrated on utility company…
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